blame it on trayflow.

I’m not back. Blame this post on trayflow, her picture and hed, “ein halb-liter, bitte.”

It took me back undisclosed decades to a beer paramount in a lifetime, time, space and memory. A single glorious glass of Weissbier in a pub in Germany.

Trayflow’s photo stirs that full-bodied memory. Und more. The long-held desire to study German again.

I studied German for five years – the four years through high school and one year at university.

I’ve also studied, to varying degrees: Spanish – too easy, booooring, didn’t pursue; French – hated the sound, yech yech yech, no appeal; Italian – loved the sounds and tongue written and to my sensibilities remains the most sensuous of the languages studied; and of course Japanese, both the speaking and writing (hiragana, katakana and kanji); to study Japanese is to study four languages in one. Or seven due to the very distinct and varied levels from formal and casual).

The German language is no kinder play. It’s challenging, particularly at the advanced levels.

Japanese is not exactly a day at the umi (beach) either. Of the five languages studied, those two were the most challenging. Have never studied Russian and trust those linguistically bright ones who say it is quite трудно (difficult).

I’ve often entertained the idea of resuming my Japanese study and perhaps one day will. It’s the German that has beckoned through the jahre … why I can’t precisely say. Perhaps it’s because I was exposed to it in my childhood (from my father, who learned it in his childhood, and occasionally we’d speak it, the only two in the immediate family four) … perhaps because of my ancestry … perhaps because I just always liked the sound and the challenge. It tickles and tugs at my gutteral roots somehow.

The reason I do not return to German schoolroom studies is the same reason I do not take classes in clay and pottery and Japanese and cooking and tile mosaics and looming and weaving and physics and paper-crafting and calligraphy and other academic and creative interests. Money.

 

Like I said, tadeln sie es auf trayflow. Blame it on trayflow.
Jetzt komme ich zur Einsamkeit zurück. (Now I return to solitude.)

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9 Comments (+add yours?)

  1. longeyesamurai
    Sep 04, 2011 @ 09:05:50

    Ne reste pas une etrangère… yech yech yech 🙂

    Reply

    • allycatadventures
      Sep 05, 2011 @ 10:16:32

      @Capra – Ai fait j’ai mis le pied français dans la bouche? 🙂 (p.s. online translation – not to be entirely trusted.}

      Reply

      • longeyesamurai
        Sep 06, 2011 @ 05:34:38

        “le pied dans la bouche” is ok but I was just teasing. I’ve heard much worse from fellow Anglo Montrealers who make a point of not learning the lingua franca.

        Reply

        • allycatadventures
          Sep 06, 2011 @ 09:09:28

          @Capra – Oh, I know you were just teasing. I do have a track record of inserting foot into mouth – innocently; from it sometimes springs amusement, sometimes glares – haha. Surely you’ve heard much worse from Anglo Montrealers – and would from me if in my 3D company. ;D 😀

          Reply

        • allycatadventures
          Sep 06, 2011 @ 12:25:45

          @Capra – Oh, I knew you were teasing. 🙂 I do have a track record of putting foot in mouth, innocently. Undoubtedly you’ve heard much worse from fellow Anglo Montrealers (and would from here too if in my 3D presence, ;D :D)

          Reply

  2. lexiemom
    Sep 04, 2011 @ 14:04:17

    Das ist gud.

    Reply

  3. fotografzahl
    Sep 05, 2011 @ 07:00:55

    Interesting post!
    I agree – even I as a German native speaker must admit that I am happy I don’t have to learn this language. 😉
    It can be tough…
    However, there are languages that are more difficult. I think Latvian must be quite hard – not to speak of Chinese…

    Do you receive the international German TV station “Deutsche Welle”? This could help you to intensify your German knowledge. There must also be loads of free online courses. Or just read some German newspapers online (www.spon.de)
    However, the most effective way to learn a foreign language is to either live in that country or have a boyfriend/girlfriend from there.

    I regret that I gave up on French so early. I was very good, but now I only understand it passively, but I don’t speak it well.
    What a pity, since I am only about 20 km away from France…

    Viel Spaß beim Lernen! 😉

    Reply

    • allycatadventures
      Sep 05, 2011 @ 10:11:50

      @fotografzahl – Funny thing about foreign languages. Whie I’ve not spoken German in *years,* when I read or hear it, I still recognize so many of the words though I don’t remember their meaning! And now, if I *do* try to speak it, it comes out in Japanese (which makes sense as it’s my most recently learned and oft-used language – outside of English 🙂 ).

      As for “reintroducing” German, Japanese or any other language, I *love* classrooms and academic settings – always have, always will. Online studies don’t appeal, neither studying at home alone with books and tapes for example. And you’re right, the most effective way is to live in that country and/or have friends/etc. from there.

      Reminds me of when I first began learning Japanese – years before I knew I’d be living there. I was living in San Francisco, had Japanese others and my first questions as I pointed around the body were: “How do you say this? How do you say this?” What you might call a true hand’s on education! 😉

      Reply

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