Lord, deliver us from evil. And a thousand emails.

Funny thing is, I don’t consider myself a techie geek.

Yet I’ve got quite the knack for digging in and figuring things out. And my problem-solving abilities are strong. Thus I call myself a closeted geek.

WordPress in point. Upon initial entry, it was unfamiliar and overwhelming. And a whole other beast compared to Vox, whose navigation was kindergarten in comparison.

True to my nature, however, I rose to the occasion. Dedicated hours in the first couple days to exploring, following this link, pursuing that tidbit in a drop-down menu. The great achievement of WP is its on-site support. Comparatively, Vox pales dramatically. After a couple days, I’d gotten the lay of the land and the basics. The initial huh!? – evaporated.

Fact is, I totally love the challenge and the learning! And my brain naturally engages in systems that, to present an analogy, require opening the doors and trespassing the hallways. So I’m happy at WP; for its design, I couldn’t be otherwise.

Which isn’t to say all is peachy keen.

What I’d tweak:

EMAIL!

1. I don’t want my email address appearing on notifications sent to subscribers. There’s no getting around it, no option to remove it. Matter of fact, WP nearly lost me on that singular count. I’m a master of privacy; I am not a happy camper on this aspect.

2. I don’t want to hear what all commentors at Joe’s blog have to say! And I especially don’t want to hear what particular Voxers/people who annoy the heck outta me have to say! I don’t care. I’m not interested. Go away!

Unfortunately, there’s no option for selectivity. You leave a comment at Joe’s blog and want to receive Joe’s reply to you. On Vox, a one-to-one was innate. Here, you must subscribe to ALL comments, if only to receive the one directed to you.

That SUCKS SUCKS SUCKS!

Imagine the deluge of emails from blogs with active commentary! I’m not a blogshound so the amount of emails bearing others’ comments is manageable. Still, I don’t want them. PERIOD. I may only want to know what Joe said to me. If I want to know what others said, I will hop over to Joe’s blog or read via GoogleReader.

(P.S. To illustrate, one blogger reported 400 comments emails in her box in a day! She’s a blogshound, however, so will change her tactics, spend her life reading emails or delete them unread, which defeats her purpose for subscribing.)

So stop forcing others’ comments on me, WP! Please! Give me an opt-out option that doesn’t simultaneously opt me out too!

While I’d suggest additional tweaks here and there, these are the two that rock my world unfavorably.

In related news, I see the Vox migration unfolding as predicted. They moved their material but their blogs remain inert. The platform rules of engagement here are so much greater than Vox’s and I knew it’d cost us a certain lot.

Of the many teachings from Vox, this is one: I’m going to be even more stringent in maintaining a blogroll of active bloggers. At Vox, I cut a number of once-active bloggers who fell into inactivity some slack in case they returned – and they never did.

Here, rules of engagement similar to platform interaction apply. You contribute, you stay; you don’t, bye bye. Sound harsh? It’s not. I’ve had my fill of deadwood at Vox.

Today is a new day, this is a new site and the future is bright. I ain’t mucking that up with, yup, deadwood.

And a moment to thank my readers. I blossom in an environment of activity and interest in the words that flow from my spirit through my fingertips to you. Your very presence does not go unrecognized or unappreciated. So, merci my readers.

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27 Comments (+add yours?)

  1. Anonymous
    Sep 09, 2010 @ 13:19:29

    I agree that compared to Vox, WP is daunting. Just got mine up from Vox today (finally) and will begin my own exlporation soon.

    Reply

    • allycatadventures
      Sep 09, 2010 @ 13:33:44

      Anonymous – There’s a learning curve. It’s not hard, just takes time and practice and a willingness to learn. Avail yourself of the Support page. Go to the upper left corner to My Account – Get Support. Good basic stuff there and a Search bar that really works! Within a day, I’d wished I’d made the move to WP sooner! Good luck.

      Reply

  2. Redscylla
    Sep 09, 2010 @ 13:36:51

    Yep, it’s a learning curve for sure. Altho my solution to the subscribe to comments is that I don’t. I just go under the Dashboard and look at My Comments. It’ll show quite a few days worth and the responses.

    Reply

    • allycatadventures
      Sep 09, 2010 @ 13:56:59

      The drawbacks to Dashboard – My Comments are two. (1) Your comment and Joe’s reply will not necessarily appear; both are vulnerable to being buried by more recent comments, especially at populated blogs, so you will never know he responded (plus there is no Find option to simplify the search); (2) The comments page presents an archive of only 10 blogs with the most recent comments activity — and there’s no option to change that. It’s guaranteed you’ll miss more than Comments Page presents.

      In short, the best and only ways to stay abreast are through the flawed email subscriptions or a feed reader (I use Google’s). (A part of me can’t help wondering whether that’s part of WP’s intention due to readers tieups and what have you.)

      Reply

    • allycatadventures
      Sep 09, 2010 @ 14:48:28

      Red – Whoops, I see the Dashboard – Recent Comments to which you referred … a different function from Dashboard – My Comments! It too is flawed by the need to scroll ‘n’ search. The Vox platform was superior in its comments/email delivery functions.

      Reply

  3. Aussie Emjay
    Sep 09, 2010 @ 13:57:12

    I also dislike all the email notifications. At the beginning on one particular post I marked the box “notify me of follow-up comments” for every comment and I must have got 200+ emails on that one. I set up a “special” email address associated only with the blog. That means my important emails do not get lost amongst WP stuff.

    I’m not as stressed about Vox going as many seem to be – people just don’t like change. It’s good for the brain to be challenged a bit…..

    Reply

    • allycatadventures
      Sep 09, 2010 @ 14:05:36

      Yow, 200?! 2-many! 😉 I too began using a rarely-used email address for that same purpose. For me, Ms. Organization and anti-clutter nazi, it’s the best method of keeping my primary email box uncluttered and the secondary email a sole receptacle for WP mails, most of which I won’t want anyhow! (The delete button is our friend.) I for one was never stressed about Vox ending, neither am I clinging to the Vox hood as if it were a tree in thrusting floodwaters. My honest take is good riddance to Vox, it was dead. The future is bright here and yup, definitely good brain food, the WP platform! By the way, I remember your remark about being lazy so have you set up a feeds reader yet?

      Reply

      • Aussie Emjay
        Sep 09, 2010 @ 15:11:05

        No, I have not set up the Google Reader yet – I did actually open it up the other day though! 🙂 I am using the manservant’s laptop while we are away so it came up with his reader and I was able to see how it works. I think if I set up my own here he’d be forced to log in and out of his g-mail and other Google applications he uses and that might make him reluctant to let me use the laptop. I will definitely set it up on mine when we get home.

        Reply

  4. revstan
    Sep 09, 2010 @ 13:59:09

    What I find frustrating about WordPress, and it may just be because I don’t understand how it works properly yet, is that I can’t easily follow people I know are on here. Some, like your blog I have set up as email alerts when you post but not all. I haven’t worked out a way of aggregating all my favourite blogs on here onto one page.
    It’s another thing I like about Typepad in that you can follow people and all their posts appear on your dashboard in much the same way as when you clicked on My Neighbourhood on Vox.
    Or am I’m missing something?

    Reply

    • allycatadventures
      Sep 09, 2010 @ 14:23:56

      Hi Revstan – First things first, I see you’ve got a private WP blog. How ’bout an invite please? Dunno how that works, I’ll teach myself anon. Since evidently you are on WP, you’ve created a blogroll, no?

      As for aggregating blogs, there are a couple avenues. One is Dashboard – Blog Surfer. It’s self-explanatory; basically just copy paste the entire URL of a favorite blog and it’ll display there in your Public Blogs category.

      Another is the route of Dashboard – Subscriptions. Here you manage your subscriptions to both blogs and comments independently. From there, you can avail yourself of Dashboard – Readomatic … which functions similarly to the scrolling Neighborhood Pages at Vox.

      Last but not least, subscribe to a feeds reader. (Google Reader is great.) Very easy to learn and serves as a one-stop location for reading blogs on WP and anywhere else. (You can leave comments via the reader as well, clicking that option just lands you at the actual blog is all.) GR is a handy-dandy and functional tool, I love it!

      Hope that helps some.

      Reply

      • revstan
        Sep 11, 2010 @ 02:51:54

        Thanks. Need to read all that when I’m feeling less sleep deprived. I’m not blogging on WordPress as I already have three blogs over on Typepad which is more than enough. I set up the WP account so I can, in some sort of Vox-style way, follow all the ex-Voxers and aggregate new posts and comments in one place.
        I’m going to set up a blog roll over on ‘Stuff’ on Typepad too but want a quick way of seeing what everyone is up to and that isn’t it.
        Will let you know how I get on.

        Reply

        • Country Cinderella
          Sep 13, 2010 @ 19:56:59

          Revstan if you want to keep track of everyone of multiple different blog formats then ‘Google Reader’ that allycat and others already mentioned, is one of the best ways to go. You can keep track of everyone no matter if they are on Typepad, WordPress, Blogspot, or have their own personal blog page. When you scroll thru the recent posts you can then click on the post you want to reply to and you will be redirected to the actual blog post where you can comment.

          Reply

          • revstan
            Sep 13, 2010 @ 23:42:17

            Thanks I will give Googlereader a go. I’ve also set up subscriptions so I get weekly emails of everyone’s post and I’ll see which works best.

            Reply

    • Adam Tinworth
      Sep 10, 2010 @ 16:45:51

      At the time you wrote that comment – there was no way of doing it. But WordPress has just added Subscriptions that work a bit like the Vox neighbourhood or the Typepad dashboard.

      Reply

  5. revstan
    Sep 09, 2010 @ 14:01:42

    PS Meant to add my friend Adam, who got me into blogging and introduced me to Vox, and is a bit of an expert on all things blog generally, wrote this interesting post on the demise of Vox and what lesson’s should be learnt:
    http://www.onemanandhisblog.com/archives/2010/09/lessons_from_the_death_of_vox.html

    Reply

  6. praxisphotography
    Sep 09, 2010 @ 16:08:58

    I was reading an article in Wired Magazine concerning the death of the web. They published some graphs which showed only about 23 percent of the web is being used for conventional purposes, blogging and social networking (to name two). The remaining percentages seem to be peer-to-peer networking and video. Wired Magazine argues that the real growth is in the net. Often overlooked, its now emerging as the dominate area of the Internet. To quote, “Two decades after its inception, the World Wide Web has been eclipsed by Skype, Netflix, peer-to-peer, and a quarter-million other apps.”

    I suspect the death of Vox may foreshadow the death of blogging itself.

    Reply

    • allycatadventures
      Sep 09, 2010 @ 17:11:24

      I can’t entirely agree. While there’s no discounting the impact of the factors mentioned by Wired, the larger one is attributable to microblogging and fast-food communications such as Twitter, Facebook, methinks. As for Vox, this article provides a solid read. (Don’t miss the comments that follow.) Blogging remains alive, it just wasn’t alive on Vox and that is in most part SixApart’s doing, lethargic, apathetic or divested bloggers notwithstanding.

      Reply

  7. Emjay
    Sep 09, 2010 @ 20:09:29

    No I don’t see anything like the RSS feed or track back on your site. Yours has 14 comments (+ add yours?)

    If you log out of your WP account and just look at allycatadventures.wordpress.com without being logged in, you can see what the rest of us are seeing.

    Reply

  8. cryinforthedyin
    Sep 10, 2010 @ 16:28:01

    Gotta say..that rocks..beautiful pic..those time when you wish you had a camera..do know what you mean..Peace Tony

    Reply

  9. cryinforthedyin
    Sep 10, 2010 @ 17:05:34

    Hello..A lot of that stopped for me when I stopped checking follow up comments..I just did that to get my blogroll in order..I still have to populate it..but now I just get posts, comments and replys..Peace Tony

    Reply

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